Todays Date
June 20, 2019

Feel free to say Macedonia

By Denko Maleski

 

Reflectors off, the attention of European and world politics went somewhere else, and we are left with the consequences of the settled dispute with the southern neighbor. Yes, and resolved, not just unresolved disputes have consequences. Now we know that the solution to a problem opens up new problems. Namely, life asks new questions, and politicians and citizens these days are not sure how to answer them. For example, are we allowed, after Prespa, to say “Macedonia”? From a time when the mouths were full of “Macedonia,” now we barely breathe the word through our teeth. Cluttered in the pang not to err, politicians as well as citizens who do not want to harm the country, cannot relax and say Macedonia, a name that will be imposed as the short name for the official one from the Prespa Agreement: the Republic of North Macedonia. Who says so? Well, the experience from other countries with longer official names, mainly for practical reasons. No one imagines himself such a patriot to claim that he is the first to have the difficulty of using the word North. But no one should think of destroying the credibility of the country, rejecting the agreement it signed. At least the current president or his like-minded presidential candidate. Especially because “North” is the price imposed by our extreme nationalism which has placed the entire ancient Greek history in the word “Macedonia”. The price has been imposed by those who do not understand the laws of international politics, and they still think that every nation can write a history they want. Maybe the people of Iceland can do it, an island surrounded by fish, but it is not so in the world, and especially in the Balkans.

Liberal people from both sides of the border, Macedonians and Greeks, are least guilty of “North” and the current situation. They did not have a problem with the name “Macedonia” or with our Slavic origin. Greek and Macedonian nationalists were the ones who produced the problem and now they are angry at the solution, and they blame the liberal people because, for the sake of the nations, today they accept the compromise they have advocated for before in order to reconcile the two nationalisms. Therefore, it should be repeated and remembered that in response to the nationalist policies that the Macedonian country had been leading over the past decade, we have received an official name that will be used at home and towards other countries, a name that will forcibly remind us that there is another truth for Macedonia. A Greek one, for example. If we had done it on time voluntarily, fulfilling the term Macedonia with our true Slavic content, the end could have been different. Perhaps neither the name would have been a problem. Analyzing a text of mine on the relations with their country, Bulgarian scientists claim that if we had started resolving the common history between Macedonia and Bulgaria in the way I am writing, it is a question of whether it the name would have been changed. But head up: no one can deny us the right, in the everyday communication home, to call ourselves simply: Macedonia.

The essence of the Prespa Agreement is the obligation not to lie more about our history, as we did in the past, laying the foundations of our identity and culture in ancient Greece. At the end of the negotiations, the agreement with Bulgaria will oblige us not to lie about our “Bulgarian” past. But when we have already committed ourselves to not lying, then we should now speak the truth freely. For, only the truth about Macedonia will free all captured minds in the Balkans. How to get the truth? I can write several lines of personal experience. I have been using my right to a free thought in search of the truth about Macedonia for decades, and I must say that it is a great pleasure. It is a pleasure because now for the first time I understand correctly what my father wanted to tell me when he said that freedom was conquered and not given away. The language was given to us by his generation, conquering their freedom. In his last “Knots”, my father, Vlado Maleski wrote: “The language was my crucifixion. Macedonian. Racin was amazed, but did not reconsider, his poetry was powered by the folk that was given to compose a poetic language, but for my future prose – problematic, thoughtful, proletarian, national, polemic…I climbed Oleliya, from the footsteps upwards … to where I will have the strength to get”. That is how we received the language.

However, your dad is a language (Macedonian or Albanian), if you have nothing to say. But in order to have something to say, you have to win your freedom with labor and in search of knowledge. From the footsteps of Oleliya, up to where you can come. In search of knowledge and truth in the field of political thought, I do decades of order, writing pages and pages, occasionally traveling and working in environments where other nations live.

However, your language (Macedonian or Albanian) is in vain if you have nothing to say. But in order to have something to say, you have to win your freedom with labor and in search of knowledge. From the footsteps of Oleliya, up to where you can come to. In search of knowledge and truth in the field of political thought, I have been doing it for decades, writing pages and pages, occasionally traveling and working in environments where other nations live. I only regret that life is so short, “a dream of a shadow,” otherwise I would like to repeat it all. But the proof that I may have succeeded is that Albanians at home share my truth about freedom, and liberal Greeks and Bulgarians, across borders, share my truth about Macedonia. It remains my people: Macedonian to understand my ideas about freedom and the Macedonian nation. And to learn to appreciate the work of everyone who tried to climb Oleliya. It is true, the Balkan one says that no one has become a hoca in his village, but I do not give up.

 

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